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  #31  
Old 12-03-2009, 11:17 PM
Goofball Jones Goofball Jones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmm55 View Post
You mean you put more stock in a given technique merely because it is associated with a large guitar company, rather than actually thinking through the questions just raised about the Taylor method?
I was just being a smart-a**. If you'll notice, I said I do the locking string method that you see Frets.com shows. I've pretty much always have done it like that. But I will try it Taylor way next time I restring...just to try it out. So at least I can experience it and then learn from first-hand experience. They're only strings.
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  #32  
Old 12-03-2009, 11:28 PM
JTFoote JTFoote is offline
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Couldn't help expressing myself!

It's probably over-kill to let the strings stretch naturally on the neck for that long, instead of doing it manually. But I've been told that manually stretching the strings, instead of letting them just sit for a while under tension, causes a certain amount of damage, which shortens the lifespan of the strings ... and this in particular applies to round-core strings.

Years ago, I used to fight with tuning problems on stage. But over time, I discovered that if I strung up the guitar the day before the gig, played for a while, re-tuned ... and then let the guitar sit overnight before retuning again, I had very few tuning issues, and additionally, almost completely eliminated string breakage.

Note: I was using hex core strings then, and I did stretch the heck out of them. But I resist the urge to do this to the round-core strings (as advised by the manufacturer), and the results have been excellent.

BTW, Goofball Jones ... I don't know what Mr. Emmanuel prefers to use, but I'd be willing to level a guess that he is not using round-core strings ... and that longevity is not an issue for him, since he changes strings very regularly, obviously. I'd also be surprised if the bulk of the members that come here change strings nearly as often, if for no other reason besides the expense.

Response? ??? You may know something I don't. Always glad to learn something new, I am. No joke.

... JT
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  #33  
Old 12-03-2009, 11:30 PM
gmm55 gmm55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofball Jones View Post
They're only strings.

True enough. It's not like your guitar will implode by installing strings one way or the other. But certain procedures do improve string life and reduce hazards.
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  #34  
Old 12-04-2009, 01:08 AM
camera_obscura camera_obscura is offline
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ok so i learned a lot from this thread.

round core - don't snip prematurely, don't stretch
hex core - can snip and can stretch
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  #35  
Old 12-31-2009, 07:47 AM
OldGuitarNewbie OldGuitarNewbie is offline
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I learned from this post also.......I should have read it BEFORE I changed my strings yesterday!

The only thing I did wrong was to not have enough string on the posts.....I pulled the strings fairly tight before starting to wind them, so there is only maybe half or less of what's recommended. So I suspect I will experience some slippage....the guitar not staying in tune.

Oh well, I need the experience changing strings anyway! I have 4-5 guitars at any one time, I tend to buy/sell/trade so no one guitar gets a lot of use, so my string changing routine is pretty spread out.....maybe changing only once every year.....too much I know. I plan to correct that error.
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  #36  
Old 12-31-2009, 08:02 AM
OldGuitarNewbie OldGuitarNewbie is offline
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I learned from this post also.......I should have read it BEFORE I changed my strings yesterday!

The only thing I did wrong was to not have enough string on the posts.....I pulled the strings fairly tight before starting to wind them, so there is only maybe half or less of what's recommended. So I suspect I will experience some slippage....the guitar not staying in tune.

Oh well, I need the experience changing strings anyway! I have 4-5 guitars at any one time, I tend to buy/sell/trade so no one guitar gets a lot of use, so my string changing routine is pretty spread out.....maybe changing only once every year.....too much I know. I plan to correct that error.
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  #37  
Old 12-31-2009, 08:05 AM
Brent Hutto Brent Hutto is offline
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I don't know what you call my "method" but it does not involve cutting the string until I'm done, it does not involve wrapping several winds around the post on the wound string (I do tend to have several winds on the post for the top two plain strings) and I don't measure the string relative to other tuning posts or frets or whatever.

I put the string through the hole in the post, pull it back just far enough to run one loop over the post then tighten to pitch. it's all in darned near one motion, one-handed (not counting the hand that's turning the peg). Cut the excess off when I'm done.

I own one of those tuning-peg-spinners but since I use Elixir strings and change them every 3-4 months I'm not impatient enough to need it. And as someone said, I can't at all see any reason to use diagonal cutters to pull bridge pins. Yikes!
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  #38  
Old 12-31-2009, 08:06 AM
michaeljohnr michaeljohnr is offline
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BB King wraps the entire length of the string.

I'm just saying.......
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  #39  
Old 12-31-2009, 08:11 AM
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Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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I too follow the Taylor restringing guide. I started using it 2 years ago and no problems. Before i was all over the place on different guitars but at least now I'm consistent.
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  #40  
Old 12-31-2009, 09:18 AM
cward cward is offline
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I do like the Taylor way except I run the first winding over the tag end and the others under the tag end as to sandwich tag end between two windings.
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  #41  
Old 12-31-2009, 09:23 AM
Aaron Smith Aaron Smith is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljohnr View Post
BB King wraps the entire length of the string.

I'm just saying.......
I've heard this too- but have you ever tried it? If you really like re-tuning your guitar in the middle of songs, go for it.
Seriously, BB got into this habit when he was young, when he had a hard time affording new strings. He did it so that if a string broke, he had extra length around the tuning peg and he could re-use the string. But this never made much sense to me either, because any time I've broken a string, it's been between the nut and the saddle. The extra string around the post wouldn't have done any good. On the plus side, having all that extra string does make bends a lot easier, which is nice if you want to play like B.B.

The truth is that both the Taylor way and the frets.com way work fine. I tend to follow the frets.com way more closely, and I don't like to cut the strings until after they're brought up to tension. The critical part is that a part of the string loops under the "standing" leg of the string so that it pinches it tightly. It is also critical that the wraps line up neatly next to one another on the tuning peg, and don't overlap. They should always wind towards the bottom, rather than the top.

For the perfectionist, there is probably an ideal number of wraps for each guitar. One of mine has Grovers, which are very tall. I prefer 4 wraps around the post when strung to pitch, to help the break angle over the nut. Another of mine has Waverlies, which are shorter- this guitar only gets two wraps around the post. Break angle considerations aside, fewer wraps is almost always better; there is less string that can shift or settle, and affect the tuning. Of course, a player who frequently uses non-standard tunings may have different priorities.
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  #42  
Old 12-31-2009, 12:52 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waynep View Post
I get dubious when someone starts out by confusing a fulcrum with a cantilever, and advises steel-wooling the fretboard with a string change. Opportunities for sliding the wrap down the string then come with pulling up on the string to seat the ball end, and cutting to length before putting the string through the post.

Of course, I'm a guy on an internet forum, not famous like . . . Anthony Adams
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  #43  
Old 12-31-2009, 02:49 PM
ironman187 ironman187 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokepick View Post
Half to three quarters down from the first fret is how I gauge how much string to wind. Half the fret distance for the wound strings, and three quarters fret distance for the unwound ones.

Here is an alternative method of wrapping and winding the string I found some time ago. You may or may not like it.
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/stringing.htm
That's actually the Gibson method. I string all my guitars that way and never have a problem.
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  #44  
Old 12-31-2009, 04:28 PM
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devellis devellis is offline
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I'v used every method and the one I prefer by far is as follows:

For wound strings -

1. Insert ball end and replace peg

2. Pull string up to the headstock, placing it in the appropriate nut slot

3. Wrap it around the tuner peg one and a half times (counter-clockwise for E, A, and D; clockwise for G), starting flush against the headstock and working your way upward along the shaft.

4. Place the string through the hole in the tuner shaft after it has been wound around the shaft.

5. Bend the portion of the string exiting the hole in the shaft by pulling the string sideways.

6. Tune it up.

7. Trim the string

This method works great and gives a very neat appearance, with about two winds on each tuner shaft.

Depending on the strings you use, this method may not hold securely on plain strings. You can take the more approach more conservatively by winding more times before passing the string through the hole, but I actually don't use this method on the plains.

For the plains -

1. Make sure that the hole in the shaft is aimed just a bit clockwise of the axis of the neck.

2. Put in the string ball and replace the peg.

3. Slide the string through through the hole with a couple or three fingers between the strings and fingerboard to give some slack.

4. Bring the loose end of the string (which exits the hole aiming up toward the end of the headstock) around counter-clockwise, pass it under the portion of the string extending down to the bridge, and bend it back over the string it just passed under. I actually also pull it around the peg about quarter way in a clockwise direction. While doing this, I keep tension on the fixed end of the string (by bending the fingers between the strings and fretboard) so that the string is rigid enough to bend the free end over it.

5. Holding some tension on the string end, I tune up the string, slipping my fingers out from between the string and fingerboard as the tension takes up the slack.

6. Tune it up.

7. Cut off the excess string length.

What this method does, is it creates a "V-fold" in the string, open to the left. The "V" itself is formed from the portion of the string that has already gone through the hole and its apex closes around the portion not yet through the hole. As you turn the tuner to tighten the string, it rotates clockwise and the wrap locks the apex of the "V" against the post. With only one or two winds, the string end thus holds very firmly because it's cinched in between the post and the windings.

I love this method. It's very secure and there is minimal excess string on any post. It thus looks very tidy and allows the tuners to work well without a wad of coils to interfere with other strings.

If you have a method you already are sold on, no reason to switch. But if you'd like to try a new approach, I suggest you give this method a try.
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  #45  
Old 12-31-2009, 06:36 PM
xodus xodus is offline
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+1 on the FRETNOTREPAIR method

actually my guitar teacher showed me that, and he's been doing it for 30yrs+

It LOCKS the string in, and is what I find the best way to keep a string in perfect TENSION and it keeps it in TUNE the best!

It takes a little more time, effort, and experience, but its what I think is the best way!

I don't like taylor's method personally.

I've also found that on some guitars alot of windings is a good thing.
Just as long as the windings DO NOT overlap
Old tele's and strats are best when they have windings all the way to the bottom (or as close as you can get them)

BUT for most of my guitars I try to get about 3 windings on each string
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